Film sets are expensive investments, and it is vital to consider a variety of factors that will affect the cost of building a film set. Production budgets are often very large; consequently, studios can afford to pay more for key sections of sets that will enhance the film instead of scrapping them halfway through production. Factors such as location, types of sets, types of actors, and the types of stunts all affect how much sets cost. While location, props, and stuntmen help to define the film, other factors such as extras, special effects, special photography, and other costs, such as uniforms, food, and accommodations, make up the final percentage. The following factors affect the amount that a production company pays for a movie set:

Factors Affecting A Movie Set Choice

The location of a film set is an important consideration. Certain locations are better than others, depending on what part of the world the film is set in, what time of year, and what the weather’s like. Film producers have many options available to them for the perfect location, but they have to keep in mind the location’s ability to accommodate a large number of people and vehicles. Film sets in temperate climates should be relatively small, while those in cold environments should be large to allow for large numbers of extras to move around easily. Additionally, if snowfall is expected during filming, film producers need to find local transportation options to get the cast and crew to their destination.

Types of sets used in films will also influence the amount of money that a production company has to spend on the props and key segments of the film. While certain props may be relatively inexpensive, such as an action figure, they may not be appropriate for a film that takes place in a city, where street vendors are popular due to the large amount of foot traffic. Therefore, film producers need to take a look at the availability of the various props and key segments that they need, along with the cost of renting or buying those specific pieces. While this information is readily available, film producers may not always know which factors affect the costs of props and key segments.

 

Location is one of the biggest factors that affect the startup costs of a film production industry. When studios produce movies, they want to be sure they can find a location that will allow them to produce high quality, entertaining movies. However, finding such locations can prove to be very expensive. Usually, movie companies have to buy property that already exists, or else they need to hire professionals to locate and construct the sets they need. In addition, hiring professionals can turn out to be quite expensive, especially if the movie production business is located in a large metropolitan area. Finally, when the movie is done, the location needs to be cleaned, repaired, and maintained.

The type of props and sets that movie producers choose also affect the startup costs. While some films require large sets that can be constructed using large pieces of wood and heavy steel, other features films may require smaller sets and props made from light weight materials. Therefore, filmmakers who are working on a feature film about a lion may opt for a lion cage rather than a real lion. Likewise, filmmakers who are creating a documentary about an African game may opt to use simple wooden boxes rather than expensive metal and polymer pieces. The bottom line is, the more elaborate and creative the movie set is, the more it can cost to construct, purchase, and maintain.

Saving Money

Film companies can save money by buying their own sets and props. Often times, these can be purchased for as little as half the cost of renting a set from a production company. Of course, purchasing your own equipment can be expensive, but it allows production companies to save money on the startup costs of the movie. Furthermore, it allows the filmmakers to create the exact pieces that they need to create each scene and film. Finally, it allows the company to customize their equipment in order to best suit the film production business.